OR Agricultural Employer Settles Harassment and Retaliation Suit

From the department of bad behavior comes news of a recent settlement between an Oregon onion grower and the EEOC. The complaint alleged that a female employee was subject to five years of verbal abuse by a male supervisor, requests for sexual favors and suggestions that she should submit to beatings by her husband. The supervisor… Continue reading OR Agricultural Employer Settles Harassment and Retaliation Suit

The Oregon Senate Does Not Want Employers to Have Access to Employee Social Media.

Today the Oregon Senate passed House Bill 2654, which prohibits employers from requiring or requesting that employees or applicants provide access to personal social media accounts and prohibits employers from retaliating against employees and applicants for refusing to provide access to accounts. We will continue to follow developments related to HB 2654. In the interim, the… Continue reading The Oregon Senate Does Not Want Employers to Have Access to Employee Social Media.

Employers Cannot Require Employees to Attend Religious Classes or Courses

In late 2012, a dentist in Oregon ran afoul of the law when he threatened to fire an employee unless she attended a 3 day Scientology seminar. Last week, the EEOC sued a Florida employer (coincidentally owned by a doctor) for religious discrimination based on the employer’s requirement that employees attend courses that involved Scientology.… Continue reading Employers Cannot Require Employees to Attend Religious Classes or Courses

Oregon HB 2950 Proposes to Amend OFLA to add Protected Bereavement Leave

On May 7, 2013, the Oregon House held a Public Hearing on a proposed amendment to the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA) which would permit eligible employees to take up to 2 weeks of protected leave to deal with the death of a family member. Leave would be for an employee to: attend the funeral or alternative… Continue reading Oregon HB 2950 Proposes to Amend OFLA to add Protected Bereavement Leave

Misclassification Costs Employer More than $1,000,000

Yesterday, the Department of Labor announced a settlement by which an employer agreed to pay employees wrongly classified as independent contractors more than $1,000,000 representing back wages and liquidated damages. The employer provided cable, telephone and internet installation services to a local cable company. The employer classified some of the installers as employees while others, performing the… Continue reading Misclassification Costs Employer More than $1,000,000

Employer May Not Rescind Job Offer Because Of Cancer Surgery

Let’s say you offer an applicant a full-time position and they accept. Before starting work, however, the employee discovers that they have cancer and must undergo surgery. Can you rescind the offer? What about if the employee asks to delay their start date and, after the employer agrees, the employee seeks to start the full-time… Continue reading Employer May Not Rescind Job Offer Because Of Cancer Surgery